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~ Decoding LTC and SMPTE on Teensy - Now using interrupts

Have you ever found yourself wondering how to build an accurate, low-latency LTC decoder with a common micro-controller? Well! Wonder no more and read on! Or, stop reading and do go read something that is more appealing to your predispositions.

SMPTE timecodes were originally used to synchronize audio and video material. SMPTE timecode data is often encoded into audio using LTC or linear time code. This special audio stream can be recorded together with other audio and video material. By decoding the LTC audio afterwards and working back to SMPTE timecodes, synchronization of multiple camera angles and audio material becomes straightforward. This concept tagging data streams with SMPTE timecodes is also used for other types of data.


Decoding LTC data
Fig: LTC is a ‘self-clocking’ protocol for which a period can be found automatically. Once the period is found, transitions within the period are counted. A period with a transition translates to a 1, a period without any transitions to a 0.

SMPTE timecodes supports up to 30 frames per second and this resolution might not be sufficient for some data streams. It helps if the frames could be split up and 60 or 120 frames per second could be generated. With a low latency LTC decoder it would be possible to support this case and, for example, provide four pulses for every SMPTE frame. To be more precise: a SMPTE frame consists of 80 bits and in this case we would send a pulse exactly when decoding bit 0, bit 20, bit 40 and bit 60. We would then be able to sample at 120Hz while staying in sync with the SMPTE.

My first attempt was to treat the signal like audio and use a ready built library for LTC audio decoding The problem there is that sampling is done which might not exactly match the SMPTE bit transition period and relatively large buffers are used to decode LTC. The bit exact decoding is not possible using this method: the latency is too large, the method also uses excessive computational power and memory.

Biasing circuit to offset voltages from zero centred to having a bias
Fig: Biasing circuit to offset voltages

In my second attempt, the current iteration, interrupts are used to detect rising and falling edges in the LTC stream. By counting the number of microseconds between these edges a bit string is constructed. Effectively decoding LTC without any wasted computational power or memory and at a very low latency. If the LTC stream is well-formed, following each incoming bit and reacting to it becomes straightforward. Finally, after gently massaging the LTC bit string, SMPTE timecodes ooze out of the system at a low latency.

I have implemented a low latency LTC and SMPTE timecode data decoder for a Teensy microcontroller. One of the current limitations is that only 30fps SMPTE without skipped frames is supported. Another limitation is that the precision of the derived 120Hz clock is dependent on the sampling rate of the encoded audio signal: if e.g. only 8000Hz is used, transitions can only be precise up until 125µs. The derived clock will jitter slightly but will not drift.

There is still a slight problem with audio and Teensy input: audio is generally transmitted from -1.8V to +1.8V and not – as a Teensy would expect – from 0 to 3.3V. To make this change a small biasing circuit is placed before the Teensy input. In my case two 100k resistors and a 0.1uF capacitor worked best. The interrupt is relatively robust against signals that are a clipping (outside the 0 – 3.3V) or slightly too silent. If the signal becomes too small LTC decoding obviously fails.