Articles Tagged 'Research papers'

~ Real-time signal synchronization with acoustic fingerprinting - A Master's Thesis By Ward Van Assche

During the last semester Ward wrote a Masters thesis titled Real-time signal synchronization with acoustic fingerprinting. For his thesis Marleen Denert and I served both as promoter.

The aim of the thesis was to design and develop a system to automatically synchronize streams of incoming sensor data in real-time. Ward followed up on an idea that was described in an article called Synchronizing Multimodal Recordings Using Audio-To-Audio Alignment. The extended abstract can be consulted. The remainder of the thesis is in Dutch.

For the thesis Ward developed a Max/MSP object to read data from sensors together with audio. Also provided by Ward is an object to synchronize audio and data in real-time. The objects are depicted above.


~ Synchronizing Multimodal Recordings Using Audio-To-Audio Alignment - In Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces

The article titled “Synchronizing Multimodal Recordings Using Audio-To-Audio Alignment” by Joren Six and Marc Leman has been accepted for publication in the Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces. The article will be published later this year. It describes and tests a method to synchronize data-streams. Below you can find the abstract, pointers to the software under discussion and an author version of the article itself.

Synchronizing Multimodal Recordings Using Audio-To-Audio Alignment
An Application of Acoustic Fingerprinting to Facilitate Music Interaction Research

Abstract: Research on the interaction between movement and music often involves analysis of multi-track audio, video streams and sensor data. To facilitate such research a framework is presented here that allows synchronization of multimodal data. A low cost approach is proposed to synchronize streams by embedding ambient audio into each data-stream. This effectively reduces the synchronization problem to audio-to-audio alignment. As a part of the framework a robust, computationally efficient audio-to-audio alignment algorithm is presented for reliable synchronization of embedded audio streams of varying quality. The algorithm uses audio fingerprinting techniques to measure offsets. It also identifies drift and dropped samples, which makes it possible to find a synchronization solution under such circumstances as well. The framework is evaluated with synthetic signals and a case study, showing millisecond accurate synchronization.

To read the article, consult the author version of Synchronizing Multimodal Recordings Using Audio-To-Audio Alignment. The data-set used in the case study is available here. It contains a recording of balanceboard data, accelerometers, and two webcams that needs to be synchronized. The final publication is available at Springer via 10.1007/s12193-015-0196-1

The algorithm under discussion is included in Panako an audio fingerprinting system but is also available for download here. The SyncSink application has been packaged separately for ease of use.

To use the application start it with double click the downloaded SyncSink JAR-file. Subsequently add various audio or video files using drag and drop. If the same audio is found in the various media files a time-box plot appears, as in the screenshot below. To add corresponding data-files click one of the boxes on the timeline and choose a data file that is synchronized with the audio. The data-file should be a CSV-file. The separator should be ‘,’ and the first column should contain a time-stamp in fractional seconds. After pressing Sync a new CSV-file is created with the first column containing correctly shifted time stamps. If this is done for multiple files, a synchronized sensor-stream is created. Also, ffmpeg commands to synchronize the media files themselves are printed to the command line.

This work was supported by funding by a Methusalem grant from the Flemish Government, Belgium. Special thanks goes to Ivan Schepers for building the balance boards used in the case study. If you want to cite the article, use the following BiBTeX:

@article{six2015multimodal,
  author      = {Joren Six and Marc Leman},
  title       = {{Synchronizing Multimodal Recordings Using Audio-To-Audio Alignment}},
  issn        = {1783-7677},
  volume      = {9},
  number      = {3},
  pages       = {223-229},
  doi         = {10.1007/s12193-015-0196-1},
  journal     = {{Journal of Multimodal User Interfaces}}, 
  publisher   = {Springer Berlin Heidelberg},
  year        = 2015
}
  • The synchronized data from the two webcams, accelerometer and balanceboard in ELAN. From top to bottom the synchronized streams are two video-streams, balance-board data (red), accelerometer-data (green) and audio (black).

    The synchronized data from the two webcams, accelerometer and balanceboard in ELAN. From top to bottom the synchronized streams are two video-streams, balance-board data (red), accelerometer-data (green) and audio (black).

  • Conceptual drawing used as a basis for the SyncSync application. A reference stream (blue) can be synchronized with streams one and two. It allows a workflow where streams are started and stopped (red) or start before the reference stream (green).

    Conceptual drawing used as a basis for the SyncSync application. A reference stream (blue) can be synchronized with streams one and two. It allows a workflow where streams are started and stopped (red) or start before the reference stream (green).

  • A microcontroller fitted with an electret microphone and a microSD card slot. It can record audio in real-time together with sensor data.

    A microcontroller fitted with an electret microphone and a microSD card slot. It can record audio in real-time together with sensor data.

  • SyncSink Synchronize media files. A user-friendly interface to synchronize media and data files.  First a reference media-file is added using drag-and-drop. The audio steam of the reference is extracted and plotted on a timeline as the topmost box. Subsequently other media-files are added. The offsets with respect to the reference are calculated and plotted. CSV-files with timestamps and data recorded in sync with a stream can be attached to a respective audio stream. Finally, after pressing Sync!, the data and media files are modified to be exactly in sync with the reference.

    SyncSink Synchronize media files. A user-friendly interface to synchronize media and data files. First a reference media-file is added using drag-and-drop. The audio steam of the reference is extracted and plotted on a timeline as the topmost box. Subsequently other media-files are added. The offsets with respect to the reference are calculated and plotted. CSV-files with timestamps and data recorded in sync with a stream can be attached to a respective audio stream. Finally, after pressing Sync!, the data and media files are modified to be exactly in sync with the reference.

  • Multimodal recording system diagram. Each webcam has a microphone and is connected to the pc via USB. The dashed arrows represent analog signals. The balance board has four analog sensors but these are simplified to one connection in the schematic. The analog output of the microphones is also recorded through the DAQ. An analog accelerometer is connected with a microcontroller which also records audio.

    Multimodal recording system diagram. Each webcam has a microphone and is connected to the pc via USB. The dashed arrows represent analog signals. The balance board has four analog sensors but these are simplified to one connection in the schematic. The analog output of the microphones is also recorded through the DAQ. An analog accelerometer is connected with a microcontroller which also records audio.

  • Two streams of audio with fingerprints marked. Some fingerprints are present in both streams (green, O) while others are not (red, x). Matching fingerprints have the same offset, indicated by the dotted lines.

    Two streams of audio with fingerprints marked. Some fingerprints are present in both streams (green, O) while others are not (red, x). Matching fingerprints have the same offset, indicated by the dotted lines.

  • Synchronized streams in Sonic Visualizer. Here you can see two channel audio synchronized with accelerometer data (top, green) and balanceboard data (bottom, purple).

    Synchronized streams in Sonic Visualizer. Here you can see two channel audio synchronized with accelerometer data (top, green) and balanceboard data (bottom, purple).


~ ISMIR 2014 - Panako - A Scalable Acoustic Fingerprinting System Handling Time-Scale and Pitch Modification

Panako poster At ISMIR 2014 i will present a paper on a fingerprinting system. ISMIR is the annual conference of the International Society for Music Information Retrieval is the world’s leading interdisciplinary forum on accessing, analyzing, and organizing digital music of all sorts. This years instalment takes place in Taipei, Taiwan. My contribution is a paper titled Panako – A Scalable Acoustic Fingerprinting System Handling Time-Scale and Pitch Modification, it will be presented during a poster session the 27th of October.

This paper presents a scalable granular acoustic fingerprinting system. An acoustic fingerprinting system uses condensed representation of audio signals, acoustic fingerprints, to identify short audio fragments in large audio databases. A robust fingerprinting system generates similar fingerprints for perceptually similar audio signals. The system presented here is designed to handle time-scale and pitch modifications. The open source implementation of the system is called Panako and is evaluated on commodity hardware using a freely available reference database with fingerprints of over 30,000 songs. The results show that the system responds quickly and reliably on queries, while handling time-scale and pitch modifications of up to ten percent.

The system is also shown to handle GSM-compression, several audio effects and band-pass filtering. After a query, the system returns the start time in the reference audio and how much the query has been pitch-shifted or time-stretched with respect to the reference audio. The design of the system that offers this combination of features is the main contribution of this paper.

The system is available, together with documentation and information on how to reproduce the results from the ISMIR paper, on the Panako website. Also available for download is the Panako poster, Panako ISMIR paper and the Panako poster.

  • General fingerprinter

    General fingerprinter

  • Fingerprint and modifications

    Fingerprint and modifications

  • Results after pitch shifting

    Results after pitch shifting

  • Results after time scale modification

    Results after time scale modification

  • Results after time stretching

    Results after time stretching


~ TarsosDSP Paper and Presentation at AES 53rd International conference on Semantic Audio

TarsosDSP will be presented at the AES 53rd International conference on Semantic Audio in London . During the conference both a presentation and demonstration of the paper TarsosDSP, a Real-Time Audio Processing Framework in Java, by Joren Six, Olmo Cornelis and Marc Leman, in Proceedings of the 53rd AES Conference (AES 53rd), 2014. From their website:

Semantic Audio is concerned with content-based management of digital audio recordings. The rapid evolution of digital audio technologies, e.g. audio data compression and streaming, the availability of large audio libraries online and offline, and recent developments in content-based audio retrieval have significantly changed the way digital audio is created, processed, and consumed. New audio content can be produced at lower cost, while also large audio archives at libraries or record labels are opening to the public. Thus the sheer amount of available audio data grows more and more each day. Semantic analysis of audio resulting in high-level metadata descriptors such as musical chords and tempo, or the identification of speakers facilitate content-based management of audio recordings. Aside from audio retrieval and recommendation technologies, the semantics of audio signals are also becoming increasingly important, for instance, in object-based audio coding, as well as intelligent audio editing, and processing. Recent product releases already demonstrate this to a great extent, however, more innovative functionalities relying on semantic audio analysis and management are imminent. These functionalities may utilise, for instance, (informed) audio source separation, speaker segmentation and identification, structural music segmentation, or social and Semantic Web technologies, including ontologies and linked open data.

This conference will give a broad overview of the state of the art and address many of the new scientific disciplines involved in this still-emerging field. Our purpose is to continue fostering this line of interdisciplinary research. This is reflected by the wide variety of invited speakers presenting at the conference.

The paper presents TarsosDSP, a framework for real-time audio analysis and processing. Most libraries and frameworks offer either audio analysis and feature extraction or audio synthesis and processing. TarsosDSP is one of a only a few frameworks that offers both analysis, processing and feature extraction in real-time, a unique feature in the Java ecosystem. The framework contains practical audio processing algorithms, it can be extended easily, and has no external dependencies. Each algorithm is implemented as simple as possible thanks to a straightforward processing pipeline. TarsosDSP’s features include a resampling algorithm, onset detectors, a number of pitch estimation algorithms, a time stretch algorithm, a pitch shifting algorithm, and an algorithm to calculate the Constant-Q. The framework also allows simple audio synthesis, some audio effects, and several filters. The Open Source framework is a valuable contribution to the MIR-Community and ideal fit for interactive MIR-applications on Android. The full paper can be downloaded TarsosDSP, a Real-Time Audio Processing Framework in Java

A BibTeX entry for the paper can be found below.

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@inproceedings{six2014tarsosdsp,
  author      = {Joren Six and Olmo Cornelis and Marc Leman},
  title       = {{TarsosDSP, a Real-Time Audio Processing Framework in Java}},
  booktitle   = {{Proceedings of the 53rd AES Conference (AES 53rd)}}, 
  year        =  2014
}
  • AES53

    AES53

  • Constant-Q

    Constant-Q

  • Flanger

    Flanger

  • Pitch Shifting

    Pitch Shifting

  • Samping

    Samping


~ Evaluation and Recommendation of Pulse and Tempo Annotation in Ethnic Music - In Journal Of New Music Research

The journal paper Evaluation and Recommendation of Pulse and Tempo Annotation in Ethnic Music – In Journal Of New Music Research by Cornelis, Six, Holzapfel and Leman was published in a special issue about Computational Ethnomusicology of the Journal of New Music Research on the 20th of august 2013. Below you can find the abstract for the article, and the full text author version of the article itself.

Abstract: Large digital archives of ethnic music require automatic tools to provide musical content descriptions. While various automatic approaches are available, they are to a wide extent developed for Western popular music. This paper aims to analyze how automated tempo estimation approaches perform in the context of Central-African music. To this end we collect human beat annotations for a set of musical fragments, and compare them with automatic beat tracking sequences. We first analyze the tempo estimations derived from annotations and beat tracking results. Then we examine an approach, based on mutual agreement between automatic and human annotations, to automate such analysis, which can serve to detect musical fragments with high tempo ambiguity.

To read the full text you can either download Evaluation and Recommendation of Pulse ant Tempo Annotation in Ethnic Music, Author version. Or obtain the published version of Evaluation and Recommendation of Pulse ant Tempo Annotation in Ethnic Music, published version

Below the BibTex entry for the article is embedded.

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@article{cornelis2013tempo_jnmr,
  author = {Olmo Cornelis, Joren Six, Andre Holzapfel, and Marc Leman},
  title = {{Evaluation and Recommendation of Pulse ant Tempo Annotation in Ethnic Music}},
  journal = {{Journal of New Music Research}},
  volume = {42},
  number = {2},
  pages = {131-149},
  year = {2013},
  doi = {10.1080/09298215.2013.812123}
}

~ Tarsos, a Modular Platform for Precise Pitch Analysis of Western and Non-Western Music - In Journal Of New Music Research

The journal paper Tarsos, a Modular Platform for Precise Pitch Analysis of Western and Non-Western Music by Six, Cornelis, and Leman was published in a special issue about Computational Ethnomusicology of the Journal of New Music Research on the 20th of august 2013. Below you can find the abstract for the article, and pointers to audio examples, the Tarsos software, and the author version of the article itself.

Abstract: This paper presents Tarsos, a modular software platform used to extract and analyze pitch organization in music. With Tarsos pitch estimations are generated from an audio signal and those estimations are processed in order to form musicologically meaningful representations. Tarsos aims to offer a flexible system for pitch analysis through the combination of an interactive user interface, several pitch estimation algorithms, filtering options, immediate auditory feedback and data output modalities for every step. To study the most frequently used pitches, a fine-grained histogram that allows up to 1200 values per octave is constructed. This allows Tarsos to analyze deviations in Western music, or to analyze specific tone scales that differ from the 12 tone equal temperament, common in many non-Western musics. Tarsos has a graphical user interface or can be launched using an API – as a batch script. Therefore, it is fit for both the analysis of individual songs and the analysis of large music corpora. The interface allows several visual representations, and can indicate the scale of the piece under analysis. The extracted scale can be used immediately to tune a MIDI keyboard that can be played in the discovered scale. These features make Tarsos an interesting tool that can be used for musicological analysis, teaching and even artistic productions.

To read the full text you can either download Tarsos, a Modular Platform for Precise Pitch Analysis of Western and Non-Western Music, Author version. Or obtain the published version of Tarsos, a Modular Platform for Precise Pitch Analysis of Western and Non-Western Music, published version

Ladrang Kandamanyura (slendro pathet manyura), is the name of the piece used in the article throughout section 2. The album on which the piece can be found is available at wergo. Below a thirty second fragment is embedded. You can also download the thirty second fragment to analyse it yourself.

Below the BibTex entry for the article is embedded.

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@article{six2013tarsos_jnmr,
  author = {Six, Joren and Cornelis, Olmo and Leman, Marc},
  title = {Tarsos, a Modular Platform for Precise Pitch Analysis 
            of Western and Non-Western Music},
  journal = {Journal of New Music Research},
  volume = {42},
  number = {2},
  pages = {113-129},
  year = {2013},
  doi = {10.1080/09298215.2013.797999},
 URL = {http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09298215.2013.797999}
}

~ FMA 2013 - Computer Assisted Transcripton of Ethnic Music

At the third international workshop on Folk Music Analysis we presented a poster titled Computer Assisted Transcription of Ethnic Music]. The workshop took place in Amsterdam, Netherlands, June 6 and 7, 2013.

In the extended abstract, also titled Computer Assisted Transcription of Ethnic Music, it is described how the Tarsos software program now has features aiding transcription. Tarsos is especially practical for ethnic music of which the tone scale is not known beforehand. The proceedings of FMA 2013 are available as well.

Computer Assited Transcription of Ethnic Music poster

During the conference there also was an interesting panel on transcription. The following people participated: John Ashley Burgoyne, moderator (University of Amsterdam), Kofi Agawu (Princeton University), Dániel P. Biró (University of Victoria), Olmo Cornelis (University College Ghent, Belgium), Emilia Gómez (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona), and Barbara Titus (Utrecht University). Some pictures can be found below.


~ CIM 2012 - Revealing and Listening to Scales From the Past; Tone Scale Analysis of Archived Central-African Music Using Computational Means

Logo Universiteit UtrechtWhat follows is about the Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology and the 15th international Conference of the Gesellschaft fur Musikfoschung. First this text will give information about our contribution to CIM2012: Revealing and Listening to Scales From the Past; Tone Scale Analysis of Archived Central-African Music Using Computational Means and then a number of highlights of the conference follow. The joint conference took place from the 4th to the 8th of september 2012.

In 2012, CIM will tackle the subject of History. Hosted by the University of Göttingen, whose one time music director Johann Nikolaus Forkel is widely regarded as one of the founders of modern music historiography, CIM12 aims to promote collaborations that provoke and explore new methods and methodologies for establishing, evaluating, preserving and communicating knowledge of music and musical practices of past societies and the factors implicated in both the preservation and transformation of such practices over time.

Revealing and Listening to Scales From the Past; Tone Scale Analysis of Archived Central-African Music Using Computational Means

Our contribution ton CIM 2012 is titled Revealing and Listening to Scales From the Past; Tone Scale Analysis of Archived Central-African Music Using Computational Means. The aim was to show how tone scales of the past, e.g. organ tuning, can be extracted and sonified. During the demo special attention was given to historic Central African tuning systems. The presentation I gave is included below and or available for download

Highlights

What follows are some personal highlights for the Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology and the 15th international Conference of the Gesellschaft fur Musikfoschung. The joint conference took place from the 4th to the 8th of september 2012.

The work presented by Rytis Ambrazevicius et al. Modal changes in traditional Lithuanian singing: Diachronic aspect has a lot in common with our research, it was interesting to see their approach. Another highlight of the conference was the whole session organized by Klaus-Peter Brenner around Mbira music.

Rainer Polak gave a talk titled ‘Swing, Groove and Metre. Asymmetric Feels, Metric Ambiguity and Metric Transformation in African Musics’. He showed how research about rhythm in jazz research, music theory and empirical musicology ( amongst others) could be bridged and applied to ethnic music.

The overview Eleanore Selfridge-Field gave during her talk Between an Analogue Past and a Digital Future: The Evolving Digital Present was refreshing. She had a really clear view on all the different ways musicology and digital media can benifit from each-other.

From the concert programme I found two especially interesting: the lecture-performance by Margarete Maierhofer-Lischka and Frauke Aulbert of Lotofagos, a piece by Beat Furrer and Burdocks composed and performed by Christian Wolff and a bunch of enthusiastic students.


~ Tarsos presentation at 'ISMIR 2011'

Tarsos LogoOlmo Cornelis and myself just gave a presentation about Tarsos at the at the 12th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference which is held at Miami.

The live demo we gave went well and we got a lot of positive, interesting feedback. The presentation about Tarsos is available here.

It was the first time in the history of ISMIR that there was a session with oral presentations about Non-Western Music. We were pleased to be part of this.

The peer reviewed paper about our work: Tarsos – a Platform to Explore Pitch Scales in Non-Western and Western Music is available from the ISMIR website and embedded below:


~ PeachNote Piano at the ISMIR 2011 demo session

PeachNote Piano SchemaThe extended abstract about PeachNote Piano has been accepted as a demonstration presentation to appear at the ISMIR 2011 conference in Miami. To know more about PeachNote Piano come see us at our demo stand (during the Late Breaking and Demo Session) or read the paper: Peachnote Piano: Making MIDI instruments social and smart using Arduino, Android and Node.js. What follows here is the introduction of the extended abstract:

Playing music instruments can bring a lot of joy and satisfaction, but not all apsects of music practice are always enjoyable. In this contribution we are addressing two such sometimes unwelcome aspects: the solitude of practicing and the “dumbness” of instruments.

The process of practicing and mastering of music instruments often takes place behind closed doors. A student of piano spends most of her time alone with the piano. Sounds of her playing get lost, and she can’t always get feedback from friends, teachers, or, most importantly, random Internet users. Analysing her practicing sessions is also not easy. The technical possibility to record herself and put the recordings online is there, but the needed effort is relatively high, and so one does it only occasionally, if at all.

Instruments themselves usually do not exhibit any signs of intelligence. They are practically mechanic devices, even when implemented digitally. Usually they react only to direct actions of a player, and the player is solely responsible for the music coming out of the insturment and its quality. There is no middle ground between passive listening to music recordings and active music making for someone who is alone with an instrument.

We have built a prototype of a system that strives to offer a practical solution to the above problems for digital pianos. From ground up, we have built a system which is capable of transmitting MIDI data from a MIDI instrument to a web service and back, exposing it in real-time to the world and optionally enriching it.

A previous post about PeachNote Piano has more technical details together with a video showing the core functionality (quasi-instantaneous USB-BlueTooth-MIDI communication). Some photos can be found below.

  • PeachNote Piano enclosure

    PeachNote Piano enclosure

  • PeachNote Piano in action

    PeachNote Piano in action

  • PeachNote Piano Schema

    PeachNote Piano Schema

  • PeachNote Piano Arduino Shield

    PeachNote Piano Arduino Shield

  • PeachNote Piano assembled

    PeachNote Piano assembled


~ Simplify Collaboration on a LaTeX Documents with Dropbox and a Build Server

Problem

LaTeX iconWhile working on a Latex document with several collaborators some problems arise:

  • Who has the latest version of the TeX-files?
  • Which LaTeX distributions are in use (MiKTeX, LiveTex,…)
  • Are all LaTeX packages correctly installed on each computer?
  • Why is the bibliography, generated with BiBTeX, not included or incomplete?
  • How does the final PDF look like when it is build by one of the collaborators, with a different LaTeX distribution?

Especially installing and maintaining LaTeX distributions on different platforms (Mac OS X, Linux, Windows) in combination with a lot of LaTeX packages can be challenging. This blog post presents a way to deal with these problems.

Solution

The solution proposed here uses a build-server. The server is responsible for compiling the LaTeX source files and creating a PDF-file when the source files are modified. The source files should be available on the server should be in sync with the latest versions of the collaborators. Also the new PDF-file should be distributed. The syncing and distribution of files is done using a Dropbox install. Each author installs a Dropbox share (available on all platforms) which is also installed on the server. When an author modifies a file, this change is propagated to the server, which, in turn, builds a PDF and sends the resulting file back. This has the following advantages:

  • Everyone always has the latest version of files;
  • Only one LaTeX install needs to be maintained (on the server);
  • The PDF is the same for each collaborator;
  • You can modify files on every platform with Dropbox support (Linux, Mac OS X, Windows) and even smartphones;
  • Compiling a large LaTeX file can be computationally intensive, a good task for a potentially beefy server.

Implementation

The implementation of this is done with a couple of bash-scripts running on Ubuntu Linux. LaTeX compilation is handeled by the LiveTeX distribution. The first script compile.bash handles compilation in multiple stages: the cross referencing and BiBTeX bibliography need a couple of runs to get everything right.

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#!/bin/bash
#first iteration: generate aux file
pdflatex -interaction=nonstopmode --src-specials article.tex
#run bibtex on the aux file
bibtex article.aux
#second iteration: include bibliography
pdflatex -interaction=nonstopmode --src-specials article.tex
#third iteration: fix references
pdflatex -interaction=nonstopmode --src-specials article.tex
#remove unused files
rm article.aux article.bbl article.blg article.out

The second script watcher.bash is more interesting. It watches the Dropbox directory for changes (only in .tex-files) using the efficient inotify library. If a modification is detected the compile script (above) is executed.

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#!/bin/bash
directory=/home/user/Dropbox/article/
#recursivly watch te directory
while inotifywait -r $directory; do
  #find all files changed the last minute that match tex
  #if there are matches then do something...
  if find $directory -mmin -1 | grep tex; then
    #tex files changed => recompile
    echo "Tex file changed... compiling"
    /bin/bash $directory/compile.bash
    #sleep a minute to prevent recompilation loop
    sleep 60
  fi
done

To summarize: a user-friendly way of collaboration on LaTeX documents was presented. Some server side configuration needs to be done but the clients only need Dropbox and a simple text editor and can start working togheter.


~ Tarsos at 'ISMIR 2011'

Tarsos LogoA paper about Tarsos was submitted for review at the 12th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference which will be held in Miami. The paper Tarsos – a Platform to Explore Pitch Scales in Non-Western and Western Music was reviewed and accepted, it will be published in this year’s proceedings of the ISMIR conference. It can be read below as well.

An oral presentation about Tarsos is going to take place Tuesday, the 25 of October during the afternoon, as can be seen on the ISMIR preliminary program schedule.

If you want to cite our work, please use the following data:

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@inproceedings{six2011tarsos,
  author     = {Joren Six and Olmo Cornelis},
  title      = {Tarsos - a Platform to Explore Pitch Scales 
                in Non-Western and Western Music},
  booktitle  = {Proceedings of the 12th International 
                Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference,
                ISMIR 2011},
  year       = {2011},
  publisher  = {International Society for Music Information Retrieval}
}


~ ARIP: Artistic Research In Progress

Voor ARIP heb ik een artikel over Tarsos geschreven. Het motiveert kort de bestaansredenen van Tarsos – een applicatie om toonhoogtegebruik in muziek te analyseren – en het artikel geeft een overzicht van de werking van Tarsos aan de hand van een voorbeeld. Hieronder zijn multimediale aanvullingen te vinden bij het artikel.

Ladrang Kandamanyura (slendro pathet manyura), zo heet het muziekfragment dat gebruikt werd in het artikel als voorbeeld van een stuk muziek met een ongewone (voor onze westerse oren toch) toonladder. De CD waarop het stuk te vinden is, is bij wergo te verkrijgen. Een fragment van 30 seconden is hier te beluisteren:

Het fragment kan je ook downloaden om zelf te analyseren met Tarsos.

Ladrang Kandamanyura (slendro pathet manyura)
Courtesy of: WERGO/Schott Music & Media, Mainz, Germany, www.wergo.de and Museum Collection Berlin
Lestari – The Hood Collection, Early Field Recordings from Java (SM 1712 2)
Recorded in 1957 and 1958 in Java – First release

Tarsos Live

Het onderstaande videofragment geeft aan hoe Tarsos gebruikt kan worden om in real time stemmingen te meten. Geluid afkomstig van een microfoon wordt dan meteen geanalyseerd en onmiddellijke feedback toont een gespeeld of gezongen interval. Het maakt kwarttonen of andere (ongewone) intervallen visueel duidelijk. Tarsos kan zo gebruikt worden door zangers of strijkers die willen experimenteren met microtonaliteit. Ook kan het handig zijn voor etnomusicologisch veldwerk: bijvoorbeeld om kora (een Afrikaanse harp) toonladders te documenteren.

  • Spectrogram

    Spectrogram

  • Annotaties

    Annotaties

  • Ambitus

    Ambitus

  • Toonladder

    Toonladder


~ Digital Music Research Network Workshop - Queen Mary University London

Queen Mary University Logo

Monday the 20th and Tuesday the 21th of December I attended two workshops at The Queen Mary University of London: The Machine Listening Workshop and Digital Music Research Network One-day Workshop 2010

At the workshop I had an interesting meeting with Dan Tidhar. He researches harpsichord temperament estimation at QMUL. Together they created the Tempest web service where you can upload harpsichord audio and let the system guess the temperament. The process is described in the paper “High precision frequency estimation for harpsichord tuning classification”. Although Tarsos was not officially part of the programme I hijacked the poster sessions to show a live demo of Tarsos with Dan’s dataset.

Another interesting talk was about 2032, a tunable synthesizer with definable Harmonics. It elaborates on the ideas of Sethares about tone scales .